Lazy people of the world unite – Blogs for Breakfast is finding the thought-provoking, controversial, informative, hilarious or downright insane marketing blogging and delivering it to you in handy spoonfuls every week.

This week, three questions to jump start your brains:

  • Social media is great and all that, but does it scale?
    Its becoming almost impossible to ignore the cacophony around social media and its importance to companies, but if youre a transnational mega-brand how realistic is it to engage in conversations with millions of globally distributed customers, and perhaps more to the point, is it even possible? Francois Gossieauxs post Scaling Social Media Programs has an interesting take on this thorny question, an important topic that Chris Brogan also tackled recently in his post The Matter of Scale.
  • What will the marketer of the future look like?
    Sadly not a post about cyborg marketers with ROI measurement devices built into their corneas (The Marketer-minator?), but nonetheless a fascinating peek into the future evolution of the CMO. Paul Dunays post CMO of the Future discusses some of the findings of the Economist Intelligence Units latest report, Future Tense: The Global CMO (click the link to open or download the report as a PDF).
  • Was 2008 a vintage year for mobile marketing?
    When it comes to the mobile industry you all need to be reading Andrew Grills excellent blog London Calling. In his post Mobile Industry Predictions for 2009 Part 1 Andrew looks back at what went down in the mobile space in 2008. Considering how much he predicted correctly from 2008, its well worth staying tuned for Part 2 of this series, which will make predictions about 2009. Read, digest and start contemplating how you can add value in the mobile space in 2009.

Theres so much more that we could have touched on this week (like this, this, this and of course, this), but theres only so much time.

Hungry for more? Stop by next week for your breakfast table snapshot from the blogosphere.

Great preview image courtesy Creative Commons and Flickr user alykat.