Three spoonfuls to fuel your mind for the start of the week:

The coming backlash over green marketing

Seth Godin points out the need for accountability in green marketing:

“The easiest marketing promise to make is to say youll do something green if people consume what you sell. That youll support one green cause or another. No one is in charge of checking out your story, and my guess is that 90% of the time, it leads to a net negative–more landfill, more carbon, more waste.”

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Woolworth’s Thomas Dux to challenge Coles

Steven Byrne is always worth a read over at Diffusion, and in this post he discusses the introduction of a new type of grocery shopping environment by Woolworth’s:

“The move marks a new chapter in the attempt by both Woolworths and Coles to capture what is an increasingly savvy grocery customer and replicates similar IGA formats in Victoria and Queensland.

The look and feel of Thomas Dux (retro name and logo) is very much in line with similar format stores in London for small grocers such as Shepherd Foods and Partridges, and the reliance of fresh and specialist lines for stores replicates similar strategies used by US organic grocer, Wholefoods.”

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Shouldn’t every employee be a brand ambassador?

David Polinchock over at FutureLab ponders this question:

“I was doing an interview for a new book about experiential marketing and I was asked about the importance brand ambassadors. My response was that while they were certainly very important when you were doing marketing events, the truth is that there shouldnt be a select group of brand ambassadors.”

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