Comms Council partners Curtin Uni to bridge study-career gap

The Communications Council has partnered with Curtin University’s school of marketing to introduce a program aimed at making graduates more job-ready.

The partnership, the first of many tie ups intended with the education sector, will see the Comms Council help inform the Western Australian school’s curriculum and provide advice on recruitment issues and graduate attributes required by employers.

Margaret Zabel, CEO of The Communications Council says, “This relationship is a great step towards training tomorrow’s practitioners and making them enthusiastic about the prospect of being part of dynamic, social and rapidly evolving industry.

“It complements other services we already offer such as AWARD School and the Graduate Trainee Program, both designed to be segues into the industry. The Communications Council WA is pioneering this model, and we hope that if it is successful, it may prove an example for the development of curricula around Australia that are responsive to the current job market and that build up a graduate’s professional skills and capabilities.”

The program will tap into industry networks and resources to ensure the next generation of marketing leaders have a greater awareness of the industry state of play when they graduate.

“Our relationship with The Communications Council (TCC) is an exceptional opportunity for our students,” says Sonia Dickinson, associate professor, school of marketing at Curtin.

“Our relationship with TCC enables our students to gain industry knowledge and contacts throughout their course and benefits students in all years and levels of study. Over a three year study period, a student can significantly enhance their employability through regular opportunities to connect with TCC and industry.”

Last week’s launch sees Curtin’s school of marketing become the first ‘Premier Member’ of the Communications Council Education Network, an initiative that will see the Comms Council build relationships with universities across Australia come late 2013.