Peugeot and Ad.IQ have released initial campaign results for the Australian launch of the Peugeot 308 with data confirming that placing mobile at the heart of go-to-market strategy can deliver immediate accountable results that can more than compete with online.

People sceptical of the potential of mobile marketing to deliver results may be surprised that mobile accounted for 60 percent of leads from Peugeot’s 308 advertising campaign. Results released by Ad.IQ not only clearly demonstrate the potential of mobile to increase customer engagement, but measure the effectiveness of traditional advertising, even down to an individual TV spot.

The integrated multimedia campaign invited consumers to SMS a keyword via a local-rate 13 number to receive a dedicated mobile content site off the back of television, press, magazine and outdoor advertising. It was further supported through advertising on the Telstra, Hutchison 3, and ninemsn mobile portals.

The comprehensive campaign which began in March resulted in mobile advertising delivering a five times greater click-through rate than online activities. This was further improved to an 11 times higher click-through rate using targeting parameters from the operators. In total, the mobile channel was responsible for 60 percent of all leads across television, press, magazines, outdoor and mobile advertising.

Chris Brown, national marketing manager, Peugeot Australia, said, “We want to make it convenient and easy for consumers to interact with the brand and the mobile channel does exactly that. Further, it has given us incredible insights into the effectiveness of our media channels and helps us develop balanced and accountable communications strategies for the future.”

The campaign breakdown shows that of all the leads delivered by the mobile channel, 70 percent were via SMS and 30 percent via mobile content. Mobile advertising was responsible for 10 percent of all leads. Television engagement rates showed metropolitan television scoring significantly higher than regional television, while the engagement rates of both press and TV were roughly equal.