Libra ditches blue blood in new ads for global #bloodnormal platform

Libra has today brought its global #bloodnormal campaign to the Australian market, challenging old conventions of period product advertising with blue liquid.

Australian feminine care brand Libra, part of the global parent Essity, has expanded its #bloodnormal campaign via AMV BBDO to Australia.

Unlike many pad and tampon product ads, Libra has this time chosen to convey period blood as it naturally occurs, rather than the more standard viscous blue liquid substitute.

Blue period pad

Source: Always

The campaign consists of a 15- and 30-second TVC set for distribution on Network 10’s The Bachelor, The Project and Gogglebox as well as organic and paid digital.

“For Libra, as the only Australian made brand of feminine care products, it is so important to us that we employ local creative talent and assets to help us to amplify the message to Aussie girls and women that periods are normal,” says Caitlin Patterson, executive general manager of Asaleo Care’s retail business unit.

The #bloodnormal spots feature the experience of periods and period blood openly and honestly in an attempt to normalise periods in mainstream culture, according to Libra.

The campaign originally launched in the UK and Sweden in 2017 under the same name, with a full 2:22-minute film ending with the tagline, “Periods are normal. Showing them should be too.”

To normalise the conversation around periods, Libra has also worked with writers on Neighbours to integrate a period storyline into the show for the first time in the show’s 34-year history.

“Periods are a normal part of life,” Patterson continues, “but largely ignored by mainstream media. They simply don’t feature in the representation of female characters that we see everyday.”

A recent survey of 1000 people found that three in four women believe there is still a stigma attached to periods and eight out of 10 women admit to hiding their period whether at home, at work or at school. 

In a society that Libra says is becoming increasingly tolerant, the survey found that 67% of teenage girls would rather fail a subject at school than have their class know they were on their period. 

Patterson adds, “As a leader in feminine care that has been manufacturing in Australia for more than 40 years, we have been challenging the stigma around periods for decades, however this research has highlighted just how far we have to go.”

“We believe that like any other taboo, the more people see it, the more normal the subject becomes. We want to lead the way with a campaign that tackles the issue in a positive way, showing periods in action in everyday life truthfully and honestly – because we really care about the wellbeing of Australian women and girls.” 

Further Reading:

Image credit: Libra and Always

Josh Loh
BY Josh Loh ON 19 August 2019
Josh Loh is assistant editor at MarketingMag.com.au