SodaStream collaborates with hospital to offer respiratory assistance for COVID-19

SodaStream has now started a clinical trial of its respiratory device (currently known as StreamO2) in the general intensive care unit of a Jerusalem Hospital after receiving approval by the Ministry of Health.

The respiratory device is inspired by SodaStream technology and hopes to offer respiratory assistance for COVID-19 patients in mild and moderate conditions. This notable pivot from SodaStream is motivated by the continued increase of COVID-19 cases across many countries and the need for available respirators in hospitals and healthcare facilities.

The device, developed by SodaStream and Hadassah Hospital, allows for the administration of an oxygen-air mixture through the nose at high flow rates, high humidity, and body temperature. The collaboration is led by Dr Akiva Nachshon, a senior physician in the intensive care unit at Hadassah Ein Kerem Hospital, and Avi Cohen the head of the research and development division of SodaStream. A special engineering team has also been assembled to assist.

A release from SodaStream says that the brand is hoping to share the innovation with other countries in the future, including Australia. The innovation is designed to treat COVID-19 patients in mild to moderate conditions who are in respiratory distress, yet still breathing spontaneously by providing patients with the right levels of oxygen required. 

“We realised that there was an acute shortage of non-invasive respiratory aids to treat COVID-19 patients, and after recognizing there was a desire from the industry to help in dealing with this crisis, we tried to think outside the box,” explained Dr. Akiva Nachshon.

Eyal Shohat, the global CEO of SodaStream has said: “It is a tremendous privilege for us to be able to use our technology and resources to provide relief to those impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic and to help save lives.”

Jasmine Giuliani
BY Jasmine Giuliani ON 4 August 2020
Jasmine Giuliani is the Editor of MarketingMag