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How Bonds’ latest campaign showcases a shift to greater representation in marketing

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How Bonds’ latest campaign showcases a shift to greater representation in marketing

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Bonds 'As worn by us' campaign

Iconic Australian brand Bonds has launched a new brand platform ‘As worn by us’ to remind the nation of the uniquely beloved place the brand holds across all ages and demographics.

The campaign, conceptualised by Special Group – a leading independent creative agency behind many recognisable advertisements – comprises of content captured from all across Australia over 20 days spent on the road.

Produced by Wildebeest, the suite of films is voiced by Noni Hazelhurst and follows a continuous timeline, starting where the previous one finished to present a seemingly never-ending chain of Aussies in Bonds. The brand suggests that “no matter who you might be, chances are you’re wearing Bonds.”

Marketing has come a long way in diversity and equitable representation. This latest campaign highlights just how much advertising has progressed in 15 years to more equitably represent the Australian public.

From zero to 100

More than 100 photographic portraits were captured of Australians wearing Bonds at every year of life from ages zero to 100.

“As worn by us is a proud reflection of the simple and unique truth that Bonds can be found in almost every Aussie’s undie or sock drawer,” Bonds head of marketing Kedda Ghazarian says. “The campaign is a celebration of these stories, connections and unique bond we all share – from the littlest newborn bub to the 100-year-old.”

For out-of-home media, the portraits were presented together via a large-scale installation at Melbourne’s Parliament Station. The rich array of characters on showcase span from farmers and wrestlers to dancers and accountants, beginning with newborn Adeline in her ‘Bonds Newbies’ and concluding with 100-year-old Geoffrey, in his ‘Chesty’.

Bonds 'As worn by us' campaign

The campaign aims to remind the nation that ‘no matter our differences we all have Bonds in common’.

“When it comes to wearing Bonds, there’s often only one degree of separation between us all,” Special executive creative director Ryan Fitzgerald says. “Bringing these connections to life took us all over the country. So many beautiful folks invited us into their lives and in many cases, stripped down to their undies.”

The campaign launched on 7 April and will run for the remainder of the year across TV, cinema, social, POS and national OOH, including the Parliament Station brand takeover and a Melbourne tram wrap.

“Seeing the authentic love out there for Bonds was something to behold and spectacular proof that it really is the brand as worn by us,” Fitzgerald says.

Bonds over the years

‘As worn by us’ showcases Australia as we know it to be – a rich and culturally diverse nation. Even comparing this campaign to Bonds in 2016 highlights a distinct shift in advertising to more equitably represent our communities.

Ads from 2012, which may not feel like that long ago, highlight a lack of focus on representation in many areas including race, body type and physical ability.

Bonds’ ‘Shop your Shape’ campaign from the same year, portrays only young, chiselled and caucasian models.

Even going as far back as 1981 reveals a bygone distant era of ‘white’ and ‘fit’ modelling in marketing. The ‘Bonds Gotcha’ ad and today’s ‘As worn by us’ couldn’t be more different.

Standing as an historic Australian brand, Bonds is a great example of how marketing has shifted over the past few decades. Accepting greater representation in advertising allows marketers to truthfully showcase the rich cultural diversity of Australia.

Photography supplied by Bonds.

Also, read about Special and the Dylan Alcott Foundation’s campaign to produce greater representation across the population by 2028.

     
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Billy Klein

Billy Klein is a content producer at Niche Media.

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